Hopes for open travel between South Australia and Victoria dashed after Melbourne COVID-19 outbreak

Caroline Dwyer 1 TBW Newsgroup
SUPPORTED: Mount Gambier resident Caroline Dwyer also backed the state’s decision to scrap the border reopening despite wanting to visit her new baby niece in Melbourne.

THE looming reopening of unimpeded travel between South Australia and Victoria has been scrapped indefinitely in light of recent COVID-19 outbreaks in Melbourne, leaving cross-border communities in limbo.

Premier Steven Marshall yesterday announced the July 20 date – initially set for reopening the border – would be shelved on advice from the state’s transition committee.

The State Government indicated

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2 comments

Good.
Our health is more important than a few selfish people who always seem to be the same old whingers anyway.
If certain businesses are so worried about serving Melbournians, they are welcome to move there any time they choose.
It is pathetic that Australian lives are being put at risk by a government that keeps letting infected people into the country at all.
All of Australia’s cases have come from selfish people who think they have some God given right to drag disease around with them because they hold a passport & never work.

I think you’ll find that most SA businesses are dependent on trade from other states to be profitable, SA’s population is too small to sustain business by its self.

The people the government is “letting back in” are Australian citizens. Are you suggesting we as a country desert our citizens in times of hardship? Seriously! Firstly, it’s not legal and what is your alternative? We leave them stateless in refugee camps in Indonesia and Papau New Guinea! (they’re our neighbours btw).

There’s a big wide world out there and your passport is the ticket to it. I think you’ll find that in order to travel overseas you have to work quite hard and save a lot of money. Alternatively you might be an ex pat which means you will have to be qualified and experienced . Both of these instances can only be considered beneficial to the SA and Australian economy more broadly.

Whilst your insular rhetoric might make you feel good it’s flawed on many levels.

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