GIF and GIRDF changes come into effect

SYSTEM CHANGE: Grain Producers SA’s (GPSA) proposal to modernise the system through which funds are collected for the Grain Industry Fund (GIF) and Grain Industry Research and Development Fund (GIRDF) has now come into effect following majority grain producer support. (File)

Grain Producers SA’s (GPSA) proposal to modernise the system through which funds are collected for the Grain Industry Fund (GIF) and Grain Industry Research and Development Fund (GIRDF) has now come into effect following majority grain producer support.

The proposal to convert the GIF and GIRDF from a volumetric-based contribution to a value-based contribution and with this, an uplift in overall contributions, received majority support from SA grain producers, recognising the importance of advocacy and research, development and extension.

As of 1 July 2024, each grain producer’s contribution will be 0.10 percent of the farm gate value of grain sold for the GIF, which supports GPSA, and 0.12 per cent for the GIRDF, which supports the South Australian Grain Industry Trust (SAGIT). It will no longer be a flat rate on the tonnage sold.

GPSA chair John Gladigau said the new system would allow GPSA and SAGIT to deliver more for South Australian grain producers.

“Our purpose is to improve growers’ profitability and sustainability and we need to position the organisation to be well resourced and effective to tackle the industry’s current and emerging issues, adapting to challenges and capturing opportunities for growers,” he said.

“South Australian grain producers’ contribution through this system means both GPSA and SAGIT can be well-funded to invest in a stronger future for grain advocacy, representation and research, development and extension in this state.”

SAGIT chair Andy Barr said changes to the GIRDF would provide significant benefits for grain industry research investment in South Australia.

“This change will mean SAGIT can attract applications for the best and most impactful projects, cover the increased costs of research, and attract additional research dollars to the state through collaboration with other funders,” he said.